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Revolutionizing Dentures With Digital Precision

Revolutionizing Dentures With Digital Precision

By: Becky Rolland Senior Living March 2017: pg. 10-11.   Did you know that by the time Americans are 50 years old they have already lost an average of 12 teeth and by age 72, 26% have lost all their teeth? In fact, by the year 2020, 38 million people will need complete dentures, according to a National Health and Nutrition Examination survey. Even though the origin of dentures dates back to 700 BC, there have been no significant improvements in denture technology since porcelain was first used in the 1800’s. That is, until now. By utilizing computers to design and fabricate removable dentures, a company called AvaDent is setting the standard for dentures in the 21st century. No longer like the uncomfortable and ill-fitting dentures that our parents or grandparents wore, digital dentures are the thinnest, lightest, most precision fit dentures available. With its exclusive digital Computer Aided Engineering (CAE), AvaDent, a company in Scottsdale, AZ, offers a revolutionary platform for the design and manufacture of dentures. We asked a local expert, Dr. Israel Finger, a prosthodontist specialist in the New Orleans area “what makes AvaDent better than traditional dentures”? “AvaDent’s denture is milled from a patented, pre-shrunk, bacteria-resistant, polychromatic, puck,” he said. “Because the acrylic puck is created under high heat and pressure, the material is very dense, very stable and very durable, and the result is a far superior product.” Unlike traditional dentures, AvaDent uses advanced technology to create a denture digitally. After Dr. Finger takes impressions and records in the dental office, these are digitally scanned at the Avadent facility. These scans are then uploaded,...
Embracing advanced, efficient technology

Embracing advanced, efficient technology

Thomas J. Balshi, DDS, PhD, FACP Diamond | Fall 2016: pg. 6-7 Remember Jurassic Park?” asks Dr. Thomas Balshi. “When Billy takes Dr. Grant into the tent to show him the rapid prototyper? It’s stereolithography, printing 3D from layers of 2D images. And it’s what we can do with digital dentistry.” For instance, 2D data files can be put into other software to see the 3D surgical plan. That’s then the basis for templates to show where the implants and teeth will go. “It’s similar to the stencils that kids use to draw,” says Balshi. And it’s all part of today’s CAD/CAM restorations, which Balshi assures are better fitting, more durable and more natural looking than ever before. He uses the technology in several ways: for patients who would normally need six to eight implants and now can have four that secure a digital dental prosthesis—or for a permanent digital denture anchored with four to six implants. In either case, the reconstruction uses a robotically milled prosthesis on a titanium-milled framework. He emphasizes that the proprietary surgical procedure, which he developed with Global Dental Science, is faster and simpler than others and is streamlined with the patient’s digital records to provide permanent digital records for future “teeth forever.” For a digital dental prosthesis, “It’s an economic shift in treatment protocol,” says Balshi, “since there are fewer implants.” For digital dentures, the process can take what Balshi calls “a failed situation” and turn it into “what looks normal again.” A case in point is Patty Jackson, WDAS radio’s R&B soul “mid-day maven” well known in Philadelphia and 16 other U.S....
What is Tooth Decay and How to Prevent it

What is Tooth Decay and How to Prevent it

Over 3 million Americans suffer from tooth decay each year, and much of that can be prevented through two simple changes– the drinks you consume and how you clean your teeth.